Sistine Chapel

The Sistine Chapel  is a chapel in the Apostolic Palace, the official residence of the pope, in Vatican City. Originally known as the Cappella Magna (‘Great Chapel’), the chapel takes its name from Pope Sixtus IV, who restored it between 1477 and 1480. Since that time, the chapel has served as a place of both religious and functionary papal activity. Today, it is the site of the papal conclave, the process by which a new pope is selected. The fame of the Sistine Chapel lies mainly in the frescos that decorate the interior, most particularly the Sistine Chapel ceiling and The Last Judgment by Michelangelo.

During the reign of Sixtus IV, a team of Renaissance painters that included Sandro Botticelli, Pietro Perugino, Pinturicchio, Domenico Ghirlandaio and Cosimo Rosselli, created a series of frescos depicting the Life of Moses and the Life of Christ, offset by papal portraits above and trompe-l’œil drapery below. These paintings were completed in 1482, and on 15 August 1483 Sixtus IV celebrated the first mass in the Sistine Chapel for the Feast of the Assumption, at which ceremony the chapel was consecrated and dedicated to the Virgin Mary.

Between 1508 and 1512, under the patronage of Pope Julius II, Michelangelo painted the chapel’s ceiling, a project which changed the course of Western art and is regarded as one of the major artistic accomplishments of human civilization. In a different climate, after the Sack of Rome, he returned and, between 1535 and 1541, painted The Last Judgment for Popes Clement VII and Paul III. The fame of Michelangelo’s paintings has drawn multitudes of visitors to the chapel ever since they were revealed five hundred years ago.

Visiting the Sistine Chapel

There are different ways to visit the Sistine Chapel which is located in the Vatican Museums.

1. You can book a online ticket directly from The Vatican Ticket office.(link Here )

At the time of this writing, the cost is as follows adults 17€, children(6 – 17 with valid ID) and students (under 25 with valid ID) 8€. Plus 4€ per person booking fee.

This gives you a fast track time stamped entrance to the Museums. You can explore the museums at your own pace and you will be able to visit the Sistine Chapel.

This ticket does not give you access to St. Peter’s Basilica. If you would also want to visit St. Peter’s Basilica once you finish your visit you will have to line up in St. Peter’s square to pass security. Entrance is free. The security line is typically 1 hour to 2 hours long depending on the time of day and season.

2. You can wait in line at the museums (the line is typically 2 hours to 3 hours long depending on the time of day and season.)

At the time of this writing, the cost is as follows adults 17€, children(6 – 17 with valid ID) and students (under 25 with valid ID) 8€.

3. If the Vatican ticket office is sold out you can purchase tickets through tour operators (such as us), you will pay for the entrance tickets plus a premium

This gives you a fast track time stamped entrance to the Museums. You can explore the museums at your own pace and you will be able to visit the Sistine Chapel.

This ticket does not give you access to St. Peter’s Basilica. If you would also want to visit St. Peter’s Basilica once you finish your visit you will have to line up in St. Peter’s square to pass security. Entrance is free. The security line is typically 1 hour to 2 hours long depending on the time of day and season.

You can book this Here

4. Or you can go the tour route.

A Vatican Tour is a 2 – 3 hrs guided tour that includes the highlights of the museums, Sistine Chapel and your tour guide escorts directly to St. Peter’s Basilica via a tunnel reserved for tour guides,

With this tour you will SKIP ALL THE LINES AT THE VATICAN.

You can book Here.

 

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